Seeped in history, Warangal is the pride of Kakatiyas

Seeped in history, Warangal is the pride of Kakatiyas

Submitted by alvin on Tue, 2017-03-21 13:45 Bhadrakali temple Warangal Warangal, which is under a list of tentative sites submitted to UNESCO for declaration as a World Heritage Site, is surprisingly not on the map of an average Indian tourist. It is merely 150 kms from Hyderabad. Its Kazipet Railway Station is in the trunk rail route (the towns Kazipet, Hanumakonda and Warangal together are counted as Warangal Urban area). The stone Gate of Warangal Fort is a part of the State Emblem of Telengana. Known as Orugallu during the reign of Kakatiyas (12th – 14th Century AD), Warangal was built by King Ganapatideva.  Kakatiyas made Warangal their Capital after over running their predecessors Chalukyas and Rashtrakootas. 1000 pillar temple A three-hour drive from Hyderabad brought us to Warangal. We were told that the most important place to see in Warangal is the Fort, which gives a fair idea about the Kakatiya kings.  This fort is located five kilometres from the city centre.  It was built by King Rudradeva when he had to shift his Capital from Hanumakonda. The Fort was extended by Ganapatideva and completed by Princess Rudramma. This fort has an embattlement of a high mud wall fortified with massive stone blocks. Today the fort is in ruins and is an open air museum, under the Archaeological Survey of India. The main attraction in the Fort are “Sahasra Linga” temple and the four massive ‘Toranas’ or stone gates. These gates are reminiscent of gates at ‘Sanchi Stupa’.  In the ruins of the fort are found delicate sculptures made in black stone, perforated stone screens, finely carved elephants and pillars etc.  They are notable for their attention to detail.  The fort is said to have been destroyed by Ibrahim Qutub Shah.  There is a temple at the centre of the fort dedicated to Mother Earth called “Swayambu Devi Alayam”.  The Sahasra Linga temple, in the premises is quite small indeed. Front view -Ramappa temple The most visited monument in Warangal is the 1000 pillar temple built by King Rudradeva in 1163 AD at Hanumakonda. This temple was built as thanks giving for King Rudradeva’s victory in his battle against Yadavas of Devagiri. This temple has Chalukyan style architecture and is shaped like a star. There are one thousand pillars in the temple and hence its name.  It has three shrines dedicated to Lord Shiva, Lord Vishnu and Surya. This temple is therefore also known as ‘Trikutalayam’. The temple is famous for its ornate pillars, richly carved sculptures and rock cut elephants. Poojas are performed in the temple even to this day and hence it is always crowded.  The temple is built on a platform which is three feet high. The highly polished black basalt Nandi in this temple is especially famous. Close to 1000 pillar temple is Bhadrakali temple which is built on a hillock. The temple’s main deity ‘Kali’ is in sitting posture with a crown on her head. The temple is situated next to a lake and is known for its architecture. It is a huge temple complex and one can enjoy beautiful views of nature from its premises.  The proximity to a waterbody makes it serene. Ruined Koteshwara temple Stone Thoran at Warangal Fort   The Ramalingeswara temple, popularly known as Ramappa Temple, is located 70 kms away. In its architectural beauty it is equal to the temples of Belur