Despite law, 70�orking women don't report workplace sexual harassment, employers show poor compliance

Submitted by alvin on Sat, 2017-03-04 15:44 Ridhima Chopra, 25, once with a NGO in New Delhi is among the growing number of Indian women encouraged to complain -- without an end-result -- about harassment at work by the Sexual Harassment of Women at Workplace (Prevention, Prohibition and Redressal) Act, 2013, promulgated in the wake of the 2012 Delhi gangrape. Yet, 70 per cent women said they did not report sexual harassment by superiors because they feared the repercussions, according to a survey conducted by the Indian Bar Association in 2017 of 6,047 respondents.An IndiaSpend analysis of available data and conversations with working women showed there was an increase in reported cases of harassment-to 2015, the year for which latest data are available.Between 2014 and 2015, cases of sexual harassment within office premises more than doubled -- from 57 to 119 -- according to National Crime Records Bureau data. There has also been a 51 per cent rise in sexual harassment cases at other places related to work-from 469 in 2014 to 714 in 2015.In the year before, between 2013 and 2014, the National Commission for Women reported a 35 per cent increase in complaints from 249 to 336, according to a December 2014 reply filed in the Lok Sabha.Despite the rise in numbers, women, like Chopra, are finding that their complaints are not redressed effectively by employers. Employers are either unaware of the law's provisions or have implemented them partially and even those that do set up internal panels have poorly trained members.Above all, there is little gender parity in organisations even today. The high profile case of the woman employee at The Energy