Carving magic: Rare metal art gets a fillip as workshop gets underway at art centre

Carving magic: Rare metal art gets a fillip as workshop gets underway at art centre

Submitted by alvin on Thu, 2016-08-18 10:08 Mysuru: The craft of creating metal work embossed with artistic designs is still alive in the state. To acquaint people about this traditional art, a 10-day workshop began at Geethanjali Centre for Art in Kesare under the guidance of 32-year-old KV Devaraj Achraya, a native of Kunigal, and a master of the craft.At the workshop, participants are taught the technique of carving designs on sheets, followed by denting, piercing, stamping and finally giving it a finishing touch with a hammer and chisel. Basavaraj Acharya, a resident of Gadag, said the process of creating embossed sheets was wonderful to learn. “There is a good demand for brass works in the market. Without giving up on the traditional methods being followed, I want to experiment with new designs which attract today's youth,” he said.Another attendee Divya Shree, a home-maker, said the craft could be learned by anyone. “There is a need to revive our ancient craft. A large number of youngsters have to be made aware about our traditional art and craft,” she said. Devaraj Acharya said brass work good demand today. “Those who buy these works use them for decorative purposes while few buy for temples and to worship in puja rooms. The foil being thick is quite strong. It requires three to four days to finish one work depending on the size and curves,” said Acharya, adding that bronze is preferred to copper as it is less expensive and soft. Capturing construction workArtistes Kala and Somesh have exhibited their photographs and few of their paintings at the under- construction house in Basaveshwara Layout. Through their art works, they have narrated the story of 'Brick, Pillar, and Shadows', which chronicles the process of construction.Somesh, a freelance photographer, has exhibited about 60 of his photographs while his wife has put up 10 paintings. Somesh said the concept was fresh. Through photographs and paintings, they were trying to capture the process of construction.