Vipers Vipers Everywhere, Not a Place to Mate!

Vipers Vipers Everywhere, Not a Place to Mate!

Submitted by Newseditor on Tue, 2016-01-05 20:47 Bengaluru: Recently a garden worker at IN-IDEA, an IT company in Whitefield, who was cleaning garden while it was raining heavily was shocked to see a pair of Russell's viper mating inside the grass. Residents of Kalkere near Horamavu, were excited as two mud coloured snakes were mating in an empty plot during in “broad daylight” and passers-by were scared to take that route. Later someone who thought the scene might translate into a human threat to the snakes called the wildlife wardens. Industrial workers in Peenya are having daily visitors and they are none other than the Russell's vipers. Mohan Krish, who is a wild life warden is in high demand in Bengaluru for rescuing snakes. Day and night he is getting calls from residents and industries to carry out the rescue operations. “Since it is the mating season, the Russell's viper is coming out from its habitat and roaming openly. It does not attack any human being unless the latter disturbs or threatens it,” opined Mohan. According to the experts, Russell’s Viper can grow to a maximum length (body tail) of 166 cm (5.5ft) and averages to about 120 cm (4ft) on mainland Asian populations, although island populations do not attain this size. “Russell’s Viper is mostly found in grassy, open or bushy areas, but may also be found in scrub jungles, forest areas and farmland. Even Bengaluru is suitable for its habitat but rapid urbanisation here has displaced it from its habitat. Indeed, we have encroached upon its habitat,” Mohan Krish said. According to some reports, Russell’s viper species can be often found in highly urbanised areas as well as settlements in the countryside, their prime temptation being the rodents around. Usually mating of Russell’s viper species occurs early in a year, although pregnant females may be found at any time while the gestation period is more than six months. The young ones are produced between May and November, but mostly in June and July.