IS THIS DCE OR KGB, COLLEGE TEACHERS WANT TO KNOW

IS THIS DCE OR KGB, COLLEGE TEACHERS WANT TO KNOW

Submitted by Editor on Thu, 2015-12-17 02:21 College teachers wanting to go abroad on a private or professional visit, now have the big brother in the form of the government breathing down their necks.Teachers planning a visit abroad have to apply three months before the planned departure date to get their travel plan cleared by the Department of Collegiate Education. The department has come out with a 12-point clearance protocol which reads like a cut-and-paste job from the KGB’s playbook.Teachers have to submit details of their income, property and loans in the last three years to the department. Applicants are also required to provide details of the expenditure on the planned foreign trip, who will foot the bill and how!According to the set of guidelines that are in the possession of BFirst.in, college teachers planning overseas trips have to submit a undertaking that they would not over stay in the foreign country to be visited and would seek no extension of leave. Worse, the entire duration of trip will be treated as leave, even if the applicant is undertaking the journey during the foreign trip in summer or winter holidays!What is more, the department also requires the applicants to submit copies of the passport and sign an undertaking that the foreign trip would not cause any problem whatsoever to activities in their college - curricular or extra-curricular.Nor would the department accept resignations sent while staying abroad.Officials at the Department of Collegiate education defend the new rules as necessary to process the application for permission to college lecturers planning to under trips abroad. “We receive incomplete application forms causing delays and unnecessary clerical work. These guidelines have been formed to ensure that permissions are granted within a stipulated time frame. Applications fulfilling all these 12 directions can be processed easily,” said a senior officer. But college lecturers strongly differ. “Why does DCE want our loan and property details to issue permission? Why should they cut our leaves if we take trip in summer or winter holidays?  Why should we give undertaking for all the issues? Other government employees going abroad are not bound by such conditions, why should we?” asks Rajesh (name changed), a senior lecturer in a city college.