NIA arrests: Suspected militants had differences on terror groups

NIA arrests: Suspected militants had differences on terror groups

Submitted by Editor on Sun, 2016-02-07 19:07 Bengaluru: Vital new clues have emerged into the recent terror arrests made by the National Investigation Agency (NIA) in Karnataka.According to police sources, questioning of suspected militants revealed that there were differences among the arrested suspects, on whether they should be part of Al Qaeda in the Indian Sub-Continent (AQIS) or join hands with the new extremist outfit Ansar-Ul-Touheed(AuT), which owes allegiance to ISIS.Sources said the differences made the two groups to have different preachers or moulvis. Interestingly, the two moulvis chosen by the groups have the surname Qasmi.One group in favour of AQIS went ahead with Moulana Anzar Shah Qasmi, the Islamic preacher from Banashankari, who was recently arrested on charges of radicalising Muslim youth. Another group in favour of joining AuT chose a preacher from UP Mufti Abdus Sami Qasmi. The cleric in question was picked up the NIA recently from Hardoi in UP after the agency came to know that he had a website and a blog on which he posted inflammatory speeches and encourage youth to join the Islamic State. According to sources, the cleric hails from Rampur district of UP but had been staying at Seelampur in North-east Delhi, a predominantly Muslim locality. The NIA is also enquiring into an NGO run by him and its financial dealings in the recent past.The rift between the two groups reportedly widened after Mufti Abdus Sami Qasmi was invited to a gathering by one group in favour of AuT. Moulvi Sami Moulana Anzar Shah Qasmi, who was arrested and taken to Delhi, is said to be a staunch follower of AQIS and unwilling to join hands with ISIS sympathizers.Asif Ali, a stone polisher from JJ Nagar, Bengaluru, used to organise gatherings by Moulana Anzar Shah Qasmi. At these gatherings in Tumkuru and Bengaluru, suspected militants from Sarai Palya used to meet, the police said.According to the police, one of the meetings in Bengaluru was attended by Mohammed Nafeez Khan of Hyderabad (from whom NIA seized explosives) and Mudabbir Mustaq Sheikh of Mumbra, Mumbai, who reportedly encouraged the youth to organise themselves.Moulana Anzar Shah Qasmi was picked up for his radical views. Even though the charges against Qasmi are not that grave, police officials maintain that his sermons had influenced a few students and several unemployed youth. Police officials point to the examples of N Huda of Mangalore - an engineering dropout from Bengaluru’s RV College, picked up by the NIA - and another youth from Tumkuru (Poor House Colony), also picked up by the agency, as examples of Qasmi’s effect.