Tweak It To Make it!!

Tweak It To Make it!!

Submitted by Editor on Mon, 2015-12-14 01:43 Bengaluru: Age-fudging has once again raised its ugly demeanor in the Vijay Merchant under-16 tournament, undermining the very purpose of conducting age-group tournaments to identify and nurture talent. Stronger and bigger lads have held sway in the national championship, stealing a march over younger and weaker boys. The competition has been lop-sided, weighing heavily in favour of age fraudsters, throwing open the debate which Rahul Dravid delved upon while delivering the “Pataudi Memorial Lecture” recently in Delhi. The former India captain made a profound statement: “The truth is that the player who has faked his age might make it at the junior level not necessarily because he is better or more talented, but because he is stronger and bigger. We all know how much of a difference a couple of years can make at that age. That incident will have another ripple effect: an honest player deprived of his place by an overage player, is disillusioned. We run the risk of losing him forever.” If the BCCI were to take Dravid’s advice seriously, it has a case study to rid Indian cricket of age fakers. A lad going by the name of Sudanshu Sonkar represented Karnataka in the Vijay Merchant under-16 tournament. He did commendably well making 128 against Goa, a game which Karnataka won comfortably. Goa was battered. According to the Adhaar Card issued by the government (registration number 2252-7164-5373), Sudanshu was born in 1996. But his birth certificate manifests that he was born on November 15, 1999 in Rae Bareli, Uttar Pradesh. Reincarnation??!! Could the Unique Identification Authority of India have made a typo error? Printing 1996 instead of 1999? Even if the UIDAI committed a blunder, the BCCI could still put Sudanshu under the investigative scanner. Though he was born in 1999 (according to his birth certificate), the birth registration certificate (number 161), was intriguingly issued on February 17, 2004, almost four years after he came into this world. Why was his birth registered so late? Evidently, Sudanshu is physically stronger than the rest of his under-16 team mates. He bowls a yard quicker than we can expect a teenage faster to do. He bats with greater maturity and belts the ball around the park with effortless ease. His performances in the inter-school tournaments had raised an eyebrow. Though there was a protest in this regard in 2012-13, the Karnataka State Cricket Association (KSCA) could do nothing as his birth certificate proved others wrong! The TW3 protocol for bone test, prescribed by the BCCI to overcome the contentious age fraud issue, is itself contestable. Five boys, who were legitimately and genuinely eligible to play in the under-16 this year, failed the bone test, baffling parents and authorities. If we were to compare the physical attributes of these five boys with that of Sudanshu, we would never ever trust the TW3 method. TW3 Protocol:For under-16:  An x-ray of the LEFT WRIST